Posts Tagged ‘Toronto studio watercolour classes’

Fall Watercolour Classes at Arts on Adrian – Week Four!

28/11/2018

I wanted to combine some interesting shapes and textures with rich colours for the final still-life of the fall term at Arts on Adrian. Saturday is an all-day class and I always keep that in mind with my demonstration. The still-life featured decorative patterns in the tea tins and the fabric so I discussed colour selection for those elements of the subject. The black box was started with soft-edge washes before the suggestion of texture. Do candle flames have a crisp or soft edge? Both options were considered.

The students did well with the flames although one individual snuffed the candle out. I don’t know if it was a philosophical statement or not. Either way, it was a very creative day.

Sustained Saturday Critique

I started off the Tuesday class with a review of the Saturday demonstration. I suggested that the students simplify the patterns of the tins and fabric as they have only half the painting time of the Saturday class. Also, I took a look at the wicker basket on the wine bottle and pointed out it’s underlying volumes and how they receive light. The texture is more meaningful when the volumes are well-understood.

More time, please! The still-life had it’s challenges and most of the Tuesday students would have appreciated another hour or so of painting time. I like the way these paintings are going, though.

Saturday and Tuesday classes start again in January. I’ll have my Winter Calendar posted on this site soon. Thanks for following and liking our fall classes at Arts on Adrian in the west end of Toronto, Ontario!

Tuesday Critique

 

 

 

Advertisements

Fall Watercolour Classes at Arts on Adrian – Week Three!

15/11/2018

It’s pomegranate season! I’d been keeping an eye on quality and prices for the past week or so and the creativity stars aligned in time for our Saturday and Tuesday classes. Cézanne loved to paint pomegranates and that’s good enough for me.

I talked mostly about colour selection on Saturday. The study on the upper right shows cast shadows on three different surfaces; a green plate, a gold fabric and a white fabric. Notice how the colour of the cast shadow relates to the colour of each surface.

I discussed the lessons from the Saturday demonstration with the Tuesday students, as well. In addition to that, I did a few studies and varied the washes using soft edge techniques.

The students paid attention to my offerings but didn’t need me for inspiration. Maybe, they channeled their inner Cézannes. They certainly made the most of our annual still-life of juicy pomegranates.

Sustained Saturday Critique

Tuesday Critique

Watercolour Classes at Arts on Adrian – Week Two!

31/10/2018

The Arts on Adrian students considered this to be a challenging still-life. Lots of objects. Lots of possible compositions and approaches. I talked about a few things to start the Saturday and Tuesday classes. Many of these students are quite experienced watercolour painters and are interested in adding new elements to their work. Following the same process over and over again allows for improvement but varying the process, even risk-taking, is what gives you new ideas.

I started out with a pencil drawing. Here’s my most basic planning for my drawing.

I refined the drawing and created a small composition. Then, I wet the entire surface with clean water. While wet, I very randomly touched in the primaries; yellow, red and blue. This preliminary wash broke the ice. It crosses the lines and challenged me to work with it.

I let the painting dry completely before continuing. As I painted, I used different brush-handling techniques to vary washes. At times, I started a shape with water and added paint. Or I started with paint and gently feathered the edge of the shape with a damp brush. Other washes started with a light value and I added a darker value while it remained wet. In general, I wanted to add interest to all of the shapes in the painting.

On Tuesday, I did a bit more work on the small composition. Also, I broke down the shapes of the pitcher to show the techniques I’d employed.

I enjoyed looking over shoulders as the students worked on both days. There was a lot of energy in the studio on both days. What do think of their efforts?

Sustained Saturday Critique

Tuesday Critique

Watercolour Classes at Arts on Adrian This Week!

17/10/2018

Fall term began last Saturday at the Arts on Adrian studio in the west end of Toronto. I set up a similar still-life to the one I used recently at the Dundas Valley School of Art. Pumpkins, squashes and gourds; very seasonal and fun to paint.

My demonstration for the classes focused on the relationship between drawing and linear composition. In addition to that, I discussed the pattern that is created by a tonal/value understanding of the subject. I also touched on colour mixing for some of these objects.

There’s always lots of creative energy in these classes and the work was impressive. I hope you enjoy it. I’ll be back at Arts on Adrian in two weeks!

Sustained Saturday Critique

Tuesday Afternoon Critique

Spring Tuesday and Saturday Watercolour Classes – Week Three!

05/05/2018

The Arts on Adrian studio resembled a thrift store this week. My pile of old shoes was definitely an unorthodox subject but the quasi-organic, soft forms offered a different kind of challenge than our previous still-lifes this term.

Once in a while, I like to demonstrate a ‘shape-reading’ approach to watercolour painting. This means starting with the watercolour brush; no prior pencil drawing! Several of the students have experimented with shape-reading before but some were tackling it for the first time. I started my demonstration with the afternoon class and added to it for the evening class.

Old shoes and boots may lack glamour but they can be a reasonably forgiving subject. Let’s have a look at the work from the Tuesday students.

Tuesday Afternoon Critique

Tuesday Evening Critique

The Saturday students have a full day and I urged them to not just paint shoes but tell a story with their paintings. I also strongly suggested that they be bolder and more interpretative with colour. I didn’t have to tell them twice. Here’s my Saturday demonstration followed by the student paintings.

Sustained Saturday Critique

Click on the critique images to view a larger version. That’s it for spring term at Arts on Adrian! It was short but sweet and I thank the great students for their enthusiasm and creativity. I’ll be in touch soon.

Spring Saturday and Tuesday Watercolour Classes – Week Two!

27/04/2018

Spring migration is underway in southern Ontario! The watercolour students arrived at Arts on Adrian this past week, only to discover a fallout of birds on the still-life table. This still-life is so varied that I’m going to show you all four views. Here we go:

What do you think? Challenging? Definitely, but the Arts on Adrian students rise to the occasion time and time again. Still, I thought it would be prudent to discuss drawing and composition with my demonstration. I touched on colour a bit, as well. You’ll notice that I selected a small area of the still-life in my demonstration. Taking on too much can lead to needless frustration.

The Sustained Saturday group put in a solid day’s work, as always.

Sustained Saturday Critique

On Tuesday afternoon, I had three new students. After presenting my main demonstration to the whole group, I took the three aside and gave them another lesson. I wanted to show my process as I painted a few studies.

The Tuesday afternoon and evening students were reminded to select thoughtfully. They only had three hours to solve our complicated still-life. Let’s wrap up with a look at their work. Remember to click on any critique image for a larger version.

Tuesday Afternoon Critique

Tuesday Evening Critique

Spring Saturday and Tuesday Watercolour Class – Week One!

14/04/2018

It was a classic still-life for the Saturday and Tuesday watercolour painters this past week. I thought that our apples and terra-cotta objects would be a refreshing subject after the layoff of a month or so since the end of the winter classes.

My demonstration was a small painting, done quickly. I started with a wet-in-wet preliminary wash of warm colours over the whole sheet. You can see the wash in the background, untouched. As usual, I talked as I painted. My demonstrations are usually a sort of illustrated talk; a way of showing a process and discussing painting problems. I don’t mind quick and messy if I can communicate my ideas.

The Saturday students used their six hour day well. Most take their time with compositional sketches and studies of the various objects before embarking on their sustained piece. Some complete more than one piece over the course of the day. I love the thought they put into their work! Also of note are the pen and ink drawings that hold their own with the watercolours on our critique wall.

Sustained Saturday Critique

We work from the same still-life on Tuesday. Here’s a look at the still-life with a backdrop of a different colour. In the Arts on Adrian studio, the still-life is placed in the centre of the room with an overhead light. There is no backdrop so the students have to come up with a creative solution of their own. However, I photograph the still-life with backdrops of different colours in order to try different relationships and to make the still-life stand out clearly for these blog posts.

There you go! Let’s see what the Tuesday afternoon and evening painters achieved. I’m back at Arts on Adrian on Saturday, April 21 and Tuesday, April 24. There are still a few spots left! Care to join us?

Reminder: Click on any critique image for a larger version.

Tuesday Afternoon Critique

Tuesday Evening Critique

Winter Saturday and Tuesday Watercolour Classes – Week Three!

28/02/2018

Black objects and reflections! How would the students at Arts on Adrian respond to this painting challenge? Let’s find out.

My demonstrations on Saturday and Tuesday focused on two main things. First, how to paint black without any black paint in the palette? There are a few ways to mix blacks. Ultramarine Blue works well with Burnt Sienna. An unusual way to make black is to mix Viridian or Pthalo Green with a cool red. My cool red is Rose Madder Quinacridone from Da Vinci. I settled on Cobalt Blue and Burnt Sienna.

The second thing was reflections. I discussed a few guidelines about handling reflections. Most of the reflections in our still-life could be painted with crisp edges. Success is based on accurate value relationships between the actual objects being reflected (grapefruit, orange, lemon) and their reflections on the surfaces of the black vases and jars.

Saturday Demonstration

The Sustained Saturday students approached the reflections with gusto!

Sustained Saturday Critique

My Tuesday demonstrations dealt with the same ideas. In the evening, I took a study a little further and added a background.

Tuesday Demonstrations

The Tuesday afternoon and evening students were equally enthusiastic. The black objects and reflections were a tricky painting problem but everyone enjoyed the process and learned a lot. That’s it for our winter term at Arts on Adrian in Toronto. I’ll be posting my spring calendar very soon. Thanks for following!

Tuesday Afternoon Critique

Tuesday Evening Critique

 

Winter Saturday and Tuesday Watercolour Classes – Week Two!

07/02/2018

I had to do the dishes before setting up a still-life for the Saturday and Tuesday classes at Arts on Adrian this week. Wait a minute! Those dishes are the still-life. Do you think this is an unorthodox subject? It may be, but the students really enjoyed it.

My demonstrations were much more about drawing than watercolour painting. That’s because of all of those tricky ellipses. An ellipse is a circle in perspective and there are several good guidelines about drawing them. Ellipse theory! Like other elements of perspective, a little bit of information can go a long way. Conversely, too much theory can lead to confusion and frustration. I tried to strike a balance in order to help the students with the challenge.

I threw a small wrench into the works. As if drawing ellipses isn’t tough enough. I gave everyone a copy of a photo of a typical kitchen sink. My hope was that some of the visual elements would give them ideas for the ‘backgrounds’ of their paintings.

The Saturday students used their full day well and several employed the kitchen sink photo to enhance their paintings overall. Have a look at their work and click on any critique image to see a larger version.

Sustained Saturday Critique

We don’t have a backdrop behind the still-life in the studio. It’s in the centre of the room and students sit all around it. I photograph the still-life for these posts with a fabric behind it and I enjoy seeing how the different colours work with the objects. The dark blue shown above is effective. What do you think of the green? Both the blue and green are colours that are already present in the still-life objects.

The Tuesday classes got a slightly abbreviated version of the Saturday demonstration. Many of them work a bit smaller and place less objects in their compositions. It’s a practical solution as they have only an afternoon or evening to complete their paintings. Here’s the work from Tuesday. My next round of classes at Arts on Adrian in Toronto are a few weeks away. Check out my Winter Studio Calendar and think about joining us.

Tuesday Afternoon Critique

Tuesday Evening Critique

 

 

 

Winter Saturday and Tuesday Watercolour Classes – Week One!

17/01/2018

Last Saturday was our first watercolour class of the new year at the Arts on Adrian studio in Toronto. I have quite a collection of bottles and, no, they weren’t all recently emptied at New Year’s Eve parties. I enjoy painting bottles and the students responded to them with real energy and enthusiasm.

As usual, I started off with a demonstration. That yellowish rectangle on the left side of the sheet was a suggestion for a wet-in-wet preliminary wash. I wet the area with water and touched in some yellow and raw sienna quite randomly. A wash like this can add atmosphere to the painting and harmonize the colours. Many of the Saturday students gave it a try.

I discussed a ‘light to dark’ and ‘big to small’ approach. In general, the first wash on a bottle covered the entire area except for a few reserved paper-white highlights. It’s like a silhouette. I like to touch other colours and values into this first wash and let them run. Next, I add middle-tone shapes to give the bottle structure and presented some brush-handling techniques to help with this process. Finally, I add the darkest (and smallest) marks to bring the bottle to life.

The students got to work. Most of them do a thumbnail study to better understand the objects and relationshiops and to  sort out their compositions.  As I patrolled the room, I notice George at work.

Hmmmm! Was that part of the still-life displayed on his camera? Let’s take a closer look.

So it was! I investigated. George was not drawing from the camera screen. He was observing the still-life with care. However, following a good look at the still-life, he photographed and enlarged an area that interested him. He then pursued his usual and traditional process and completed his thumbnail sketch from observation. Cameras, phones and iPads have made their way into studio and ‘en plein air’ practice for some time now. I approve of the way George balanced the old and the new.

If you’ve never attended a Sustained Saturday, why don’t you consider joining us soon? It’s a very vibrant day of creativity in excellent and supportive company. Here’s what they did with the bottles. Click on any critique image for a larger version.

Sustained Saturday Critique

This is another view of the bottle still-life with a different backdrop colour.

My demonstrations for the Tuesday classes dealt with the same ideas. I did develop a transparency a bit more and you can see it on the right side of the sheet where I’ve attempted to show the wooden box through the green bottle.

The Tuesday students applied themselves to the task with zeal. Remember that they have much less time to work on their paintings than their Saturday counterparts but come up with some very solid results.

There’s still a spot for you in an upcoming Tuesday or Saturday class. Check out my Winter Studio Calendar!

Tuesday Afternoon Critique

Tuesday Evening Critique